German Navy Museum-Wilhelmshaven/Germany

Marinemuseum_Wilhelmshaven
CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=118752

Maritime_Meile
By KuK, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=382621

 
Submarine Type 205-U10
1200px-Marinemuseum_Wilhelmshaven_-_Flickr_-_Axel_Schwenke_(33)
By Axel Schwenke from Meschede, Deutschland – Marinemuseum Wilhelmshaven, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=18472298

Baarle-Nassau (The Netherlands)—The fascinatingly complicated border town

Baarle-Nassau town hall
1200px-P1070673Gemeentehuis
By G.LantingOwn work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=17768314

Baarle-Nassau  is a municipality and a town in the southern Netherlands, located in North Brabant province. It had a population of 6,626 in 2014.
It is closely linked, with complicated borders, to the Belgian exclaves of Baarle-Hertog. Baarle-Hertog consists of 26 separate pieces of land. Apart from the main piece (called Zondereigen) located north of the Belgian town of Merksplas, there are 22 Belgian exclaves in the Netherlands and three other pieces on the Dutch-Belgian border. There are also six Dutch exclaves located within the largest Belgian exclave, one within the second-largest, and an eighth within Zondereigen. The smallest Belgian parcel, H22, measures 2,632 square metres (about 28,330 square feet).
The border’s complexity results from a number of equally complex medieval treaties, agreements, land-swaps and sales between the Lords of Breda and the Dukes of Brabant. Generally speaking, predominantly agricultural or built environments became constituents of Brabant, other parts devolved to Breda. These distributions were ratified and clarified as a part of the borderline settlements arrived at during the Treaty of Maastricht in 1843.
For clarification and the interest of tourists, the border is made visible on all streets with iron pins. This way it is always clear whether one is in Belgium (Baarle-Hertog) or in The Netherlands (Baarle-Nassau). This is also visible on the house numbers: the style of house numbers is different in both countries and often one will find the Dutch or Belgian flag next to the number.
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Border between Netherlands and Belgium in Baarle-Nassau
Baarle-Nassau_frontière_café
By User:JérômeOwn work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1564073

Plemont Beach/Plemont RNLI lookout Point (Jersey)

Plemont Beach15100717301_b978e93f86_bPlemont RNLI look out point.by westy48 on flickr” (CC BY-SA 2.0) by  westy48 

A beautiful beach with rock pools and sea caves.

 

Hohlgangsanlage 8—German Underground Hospital a.k.a. Jersey War Tunnels (Jersey/St. Lawrence)

713px-German_Underground_Hospital_entrance_Jersey
By Man vyi – Own work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=977456

Hohlgangsanlage 8 (often abbreviated to Ho8, also known as the German Underground Hospital or the Jersey War Tunnels) was a partially completed underground hospital complex in St. Lawrence, Jersey, built by German occupying forces during the occupation of Jersey during World War II. Over 1 km (1,100 yd) of tunnels were completed. After the liberation of the Channel Islands, the complex was converted into a museum detailing the occupation and remains a visitor attraction.In July 1946, the States of Jersey opened the tunnels to the public. In 1961, the Royal Court ruled that the subterranean complex belonged to the private owners of the land above it, and Ho8 fell under private ownership. The complex was restored, with a collection of Occupation memorabilia and a museum and memorial to the occupation being set up. In 2001, a permanent exhibit called “Captive Island” was unveiled in the tunnel complex, detailing everyday life for civilians in Jersey before, during and after the occupation of Jersey. Today, Ho8 is generally referred to as the “Jersey War Tunnels”. The Jersey War Tunnels has also housed military vehicles such as a Char B1 bis tank, which served in Jersey with the Panzer-Abteilung 213 during the occupation which was on loan from the The Tank Museum. As of March 2012 there is also a replica Stug III tank destroyer owned by the war tunnels.
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Kalya Beach/Dead Sea (Israel)

1200px-Dead_Sea_Qalya_Beach2
By Darko Tepert DonatusOwn work, CC BY-SA 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1760125

Kalya has a population of 300 and depends mainly on agriculture, primarily consisting of dairy farming and raising date palms, watermelons and cherry tomatoes. The kibbutz also runs the Israel Nature and Parks Authority visitor’s centre of the nearby Qumran Caves, where the Dead Sea Scrolls were found. At one time, the kibbutz operated a water park.

A private beach run by the kibbutz is popular with Israelis, Christian pilgrims and tourists. The wooden building near the seashore where people can drink, eat and chat is rightly called the lowest bar in the world (-417), some lower of the entrance one. Since the easing of travel restrictions in the West Bank and the removal of major roadblocks, Palestinians also come to swim there.

The kibbutz serves as a rest stop between Jerusalem and Ein Gedi due to its proximity to the Beit HaArava Junction between Highway 90 and Highway 1.
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Tropical Islands Resort—(Germany/Brandenburg)

Tropical_Island_0002
By User: DerFussi at wikivoyage shared, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=22685457

Tropical Islands Resort is a tropical theme park located in the former Brand-Briesen Airfield in Krausnick, in the Halbe municipality in the district of Dahme-Spreewald in Brandenburg, Germany, 50 kilometres from the southern boundary of Berlin. It is housed in the former CargoLifter airship hangar (known as the Aerium), the biggest free-standing hall in the world. The hall belonged to the company CargoLifter until its insolvency in 2002.

Tropical Islands has a maximum capacity of 6,000 visitors a day. In its first year of operation it attracted 975,000 visitors, according to the operators. The Tanjong company reported 155,000 visitors in the business year February 2004 to February 2005. Approximately 500 people work at Tropical Islands.

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1200px-Tropical_Islands_Bali-Pavillon_im_Tropendorf
By Tropical Islands ResortOwn work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=22302824

Tropical Islands Bali Pavilion in the Tropical Village

Externsteine—Sandstone rock formation located in the Teutoburg Forest (Germany/North Rhine-Westphalia)

1200px-Externsteine_2011
By CatMan61Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=18160992

St Michael`s Mount, Marazion in Cornwall U.K.

1200px-St_Michael's_Mount_II5302_x_2982
By FuzzypiggyOwn work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=35601801

St Michael’s Mount is a small tidal island in Mount’s Bay, Cornwall, United Kingdom

Kyffhäuser Monument a.k.a. Barbarossa Monument near Bad Frankenhausen (Germany/Thuringia)

1200px-Kyffhaeuserdenkmal_front_view
By kirq (Tomasz Halszka) – Own work, CC BY-SA 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1603247

The monument was erected in honour of Emperor William I.It also features a sandstone figure of Frederick Barbarossa (Frederick I).