Cloppenburg Museum Village— (Cloppenburg/Germany)

Cloppenburg Museum Village
1200px-Museumsdorf-Cloppenburg
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Cloppenburg Museum Village
1200px-Museum_IMG_7768_cloppenburg_museumsdorf
By BjoertvedtOwn work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=42699511

 

The Cloppenburg Museum Village and Lower Saxon Open-Air Museum (German: Museumsdorf Cloppenburg – Niedersächsisches Freilichtmuseum) located in the Lower Saxon county town of Cloppenburg is the oldest museum village in Germany. The museum is a research and educational establishment specializing in cultural and rural history.

The Lower Saxon Open-Air Museum is a non-profit organisation. Although the museum does not set out to compete for visitors, in 2009 the Cloppenburg Museum Village had more visitors than any other museum in Lower Saxony (250,000). In 2004, the museum was visited by more than 60,000 students as a part of their school curriculum.

Covering an area of about 20 hectares (49 acres), the Lower Saxon Open-Air Museum portrays the history of rural life in the Lower Saxony region from 16th century to the present. Over 50 historic buildings, with their associated rural gardens and surrounding agricultural fields, illustrate the relationship of man to his environment over the course of time.

In the early days a form of reconstruction was chosen that showed the houses in their original state. Important design variants of the Low German house and East Frisian Gulfhaus are presented in this way. Since the 1970s, houses have been re-assembled, conserving the traces of their history and illustrating aspects of the life of their former occupants.

In addition to buildings that underpinned farming and crafts and the residential homes of country folk, the museum terrain also has a timber framed church from Klein-Escherde (built in 1698) and a village school from Renslage (built in 1751).

Outside the actual museum village land, north of Höltinghauser Straße, a large moor plough displayed. More information about the individual exhibits is available in an interactive location plan.

In 2011, planning began on the construction of a new entrance hall and integrated cultural-historical centre. Funding will be provided by the state of Lower Saxony, and the district and town of Cloppenburg. In the same year, construction started on a wheelwrights home dating to 1564. On completion, it will be oldest building on the museum village site.
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Büsingen am Hochrhein—A German exclave in Switzerland

Büsingen am Hochrhein
1200px-Büsingen_am_Hochrhein
By Prekario – Own work, all rights released (public domain), Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2065185

 
Location of Büsingen
Location_of_Büsingen_in_detail
By Julian Fleischer aka Warhog (German original); translated by xensyria – , CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=31811102

 
Swiss and German telephone booths in front of the mayor`s office
600px-Büsingen_am_Hochrhein_Swiss_and_German_Telephone_Booth
By DavidmoerikeOwn work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4091963

 

Büsingen am Hochrhein (“Buesingen on the High Rhine”), commonly known as Büsingen, is a German town (7.62 km2 or 2.94 sq mi) entirely surrounded by the Swiss canton of Schaffhausen and, south across the High Rhine, by the Swiss cantons of Zürich and Thurgau. It has a population of about 1,450 inhabitants. Since the early 19th century, the town has been separated from the rest of Germany by a narrow strip of land (at its narrowest, about 700 m wide) containing the Swiss village of Dörflingen.

Administratively, Büsingen is part of Germany, forming part of the district of Konstanz, in the Bundesland of Baden-Württemberg, but economically, it forms part of the Swiss customs area, as do the independent principality of Liechtenstein and the Italian town of Campione d’Italia. There are no border controls between Switzerland and Büsingen or the rest of Germany since Switzerland joined the Schengen Area in 2008/09.

Büsingen is highly regarded as a holiday destination in summer by both German and Swiss visitors from around the area for its recreational areas along the Rhine. The town is also the home of the European Nazarene College, a relatively large and internationally oriented Bible college.
The text above is an excerpt from a Wikipedia article which is based on work by 172.56.22.179,Cyberbot II,SSTflyer and other users.The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 license