Cloppenburg Museum Village— (Cloppenburg/Germany)

Cloppenburg Museum Village
1200px-Museumsdorf-Cloppenburg
By Wittkowsky – Oain Wierk, CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4151101

 
Cloppenburg Museum Village
1200px-Museum_IMG_7768_cloppenburg_museumsdorf
By BjoertvedtOwn work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=42699511

 

The Cloppenburg Museum Village and Lower Saxon Open-Air Museum (German: Museumsdorf Cloppenburg – Niedersächsisches Freilichtmuseum) located in the Lower Saxon county town of Cloppenburg is the oldest museum village in Germany. The museum is a research and educational establishment specializing in cultural and rural history.

The Lower Saxon Open-Air Museum is a non-profit organisation. Although the museum does not set out to compete for visitors, in 2009 the Cloppenburg Museum Village had more visitors than any other museum in Lower Saxony (250,000). In 2004, the museum was visited by more than 60,000 students as a part of their school curriculum.

Covering an area of about 20 hectares (49 acres), the Lower Saxon Open-Air Museum portrays the history of rural life in the Lower Saxony region from 16th century to the present. Over 50 historic buildings, with their associated rural gardens and surrounding agricultural fields, illustrate the relationship of man to his environment over the course of time.

In the early days a form of reconstruction was chosen that showed the houses in their original state. Important design variants of the Low German house and East Frisian Gulfhaus are presented in this way. Since the 1970s, houses have been re-assembled, conserving the traces of their history and illustrating aspects of the life of their former occupants.

In addition to buildings that underpinned farming and crafts and the residential homes of country folk, the museum terrain also has a timber framed church from Klein-Escherde (built in 1698) and a village school from Renslage (built in 1751).

Outside the actual museum village land, north of Höltinghauser Straße, a large moor plough displayed. More information about the individual exhibits is available in an interactive location plan.

In 2011, planning began on the construction of a new entrance hall and integrated cultural-historical centre. Funding will be provided by the state of Lower Saxony, and the district and town of Cloppenburg. In the same year, construction started on a wheelwrights home dating to 1564. On completion, it will be oldest building on the museum village site.
The text above is an excerpt from a Wikipedia article which is based on work by Cydebot,Ulf Heinsohn,Magioladitis and other users.The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 license

Hill of Crosses—(Lithuania/Šiauliai)

Close view of the Hill of Crosses
Hill of crosses1200px-Kryžių_kalnas_(Góra_Krzyży)
By Pudelek (Marcin Szala) – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=17124232

 

The Hill of Crosses (Lithuanian:Kryžių kalnas ) is a site of pilgrimage about 12 km north of the city of Šiauliai, in northern Lithuania. The precise origin of the practice of leaving crosses on the hill is uncertain, but it is believed that the first crosses were placed on the former Jurgaičiai or Domantai hill fort after the 1831 Uprising.[1] Over the generations, not only crosses and crucifixes, but statues of the Virgin Mary, carvings of Lithuanian patriots and thousands of tiny effigies and rosaries have been brought here by Catholic pilgrims. The exact number of crosses is unknown, but estimates put it at about 55,000 in 1990 and 100,000 in 2006.
The text above is an excerpt from a Wikipedia article which is based on work by 90.214.70.166,JoeHebda,Fishlandia and other users.The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 license